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This Month’s Trailfoody + BGood Bar Spotlight

This month’s Wanderer (powers 1 to 2 outings) has a Mediterranean theme:

  • Stacy’s Pita Chips—Gives a nice crunch. Plus, they pair really well with the hummus.
  • Wild Garden Hummus—This hummus is yummus.
  • Mediterra Sundried Tomato & Basil bar—Most energy bars are sweet, but this one is savory! What a great idea, and perfect for a lunch stop.
  • Basil and Garlic Oloves—These little olives pack a ton of flavor. Refreshing, too.
  • Fruit Bliss Organic Turkish Figs—Let’s just say we had a hard time making sure all of these made it into the shipping boxes.
  • Vermont Smoke & Cure Cracked Pepper Beef & Pork stick—Because, who doesn’t like a meat stick?
  • Stur Organic Truly Fruit Punch drink mix—Very flavorful and full of Vitamin C, this will help you stay hydrated.
  • Probar Superfruit Slam—This meal-in-a-bar is tough stuff. It’s filling with a nice, wholesome, fruity flavor.
  • Kate’s Natural Foods Tram Bar—You can’t beat the milk chocolate and peanut butter combination. This meal-in-a-bar can be used on its own for small excursions.
  • BGood Peanut Ginger Bar—This one’s a treasure, and it’s reviewed by our tasters below.

BGood Peanut Ginger Bar
It tastes like a fine chocolate truffle, but gives you an energy boost for any adventure. And, it’s made from high quality ingredients such as toasted peanuts, cashews, oats, peanut butter, local honey, organic flax seed meal, crystallized ginger, fair trade dark chocolate, sesame seeds and sea salt.

What the Tasters Said About the BGood Peanut Ginger Bar

Grif Steele
Glissade Racer

“The amount of energy packed into this compact bar amazed me.”

Britt Foodlove
Cheesecake Whisperer

“It’s like a piece of art. First, the smooth dark chocolate. Then, the peanut butter and a dash of honey combine, ending with a subtle zing of ginger.”

Gracie
Iditarod Fan

“Britt dropped some on the ground, but Grif beat me to it.”

Ready to try this bar (and many other great trailfoods)?

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Rugged Living & Love of Outdoors Inspire this Indulgent Energy Bar

Enjoy this guest blog post about the inspiration behind BGood Bars, written by Katy Nesbitt. We are excited to include BGood’s Peanut Ginger Bar—a very special find—in January’s Trailfoody.


BGood Bars were born from a combination of practicality and indulgence – a healthy snack with delicious ingredients that fits easily in a pocket. This combination was designed by Judy Goodman – a woman who knows how to live well out of a backpack or in a cabin on a remote cattle ranch.

Judy says she grew up in Central Washington with a love of the outdoors and the opportunity to cook and garden with her mother and her grandmother.

BGood Bars
Making these rugged, yet indulgent energy bars.

“Living on a farm, they taught me how to improvise in the kitchen by substituting for things we didn’t have on hand.” My grandmother used to say, “You can always make something out of nothing.”

When she was 27 years old she was backpacking in the Wallowas and devised her first trail bar, primarily comprised of nuts, dried fruit, eggs, whole wheat and chocolate.

With 20 years as a fisheries biologist and 15 years living on a remote Idaho ranch where the best means of transportation for many months of the year was a snowmobile, Judy lived her grandmother’s mantra—maybe not making something out of nothing—but, a rugged lifestyle doesn’t have to mean “roughing it.”

Judy and her husband, Bob, left the Sawtooth Mountains and moved to the base of the Wallowas in Joseph, Oregon, where she was trained as a chocolatier by a retired fish biologist in a Main Street shop. There, she came up with recipes for a snack similar in taste to a fine chocolate truffle with the energy boost needed to finish the hike, bike or ski.

Now, Judy runs her own kitchen making fine, hand-crafted products on Joseph’s Main Street making BGood Bars from a special formula of the highest quality ingredients wrapped in recyclable packaging – energy bars for active people with a conscience.

When not making and shipping bars to customers around the U.S., Judy joins Bob on a ski out the back door of their log cabin with a BGood bar in each pocket and up to the top of Wallowa Lake’s east moraine. From the top of the ridgeline, they can take in the view of Chief Joseph Mountain and the lake in one direction and Idaho’s Seven Devils Range to the east – a perfect opportunity to enjoy a bar made with nuts and fruit and hand-dipped in the finest dark chocolate.

“Ultimately the best food choices are always those closest to their original forms in nature. BGood Bars are a sophisticated great tasting snack that is healthy enough for the athlete and outdoor enthusiast, or decadent enough to serve for dessert,” says Judy Goodman.

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This Month’s Trailfoody + Grizzly Bar Spotlight

This month’s Wanderer (powers 1 to 2 outings) includes the following tasty things:

  • Tanka Bar Cranberry and Buffalo jerky–the only thing better than beef jerky is buffalo jerky
  • Crunchmaster gluten-free crackers–nom, nom, nom
  • Justin’s almond butter–every hiker’s fave
  • Peeled dried mango–it’s mango, no need to say anything else
  • Sahale Snacks’ fruit and nut classic trail mix–we’re nuts about Sahale
  • Skratch Labs’ lemon + lime hydration mix–probably the best tasting way to recharge those electrolytes
  • Go Raw all-organic sprouted apricot bar–the fresh taste is what stood out to us
  • K’ul artisan Endurance chocolate bar–amazing this is an energy bar
  • a dark chocolate chili almond Kind bar–this thing’s gotta kick
  • and Kate’s Real Food’s Grizzly Bar–read below!

This month, the Trailfoody tasters review the Grizzly Bar. Here’s what they had to say:

December’s Spotlight:  The Grizzly Bar

This is a whopper of an energy bar that tastes delicious. Flavors of peanut butter, sweet blossom honey, chewy dried fruit, and dark chocolate combine in this tasty bar that can get you to the top of any mountain. This bar can supplement a meal or be used on its own for small excursions.

What the Tasters Said About Kate’s Real Food’s Grizzly Bar

Grif Steele
High Altitude Snow Angel Record Holder

“If a grizzly bear tried to eat my Grizzly Bar, I’d bite ’em.”

Britt Foodlove
Professional Curry Taster

“With a satisfying, chewy mouthfeel, the peanut butter and honey combine perfectly. The bonus: a  dark chocolate finish.”

Gracie
Wannabe Taste Tester

“There wasn’t any left over for me to taste. However, I can tell you that it smelled real nice.”

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This “TripTarp” is a great idea.

Is it a tarp or is it a checklist? Hey, it’s both! This 5’x7′ tarp weighs only 8.6 oz., so it’s great as an ultralight bivy or as an emergency shelter. Plus, it has a gear checklist printed on the back complete with spaces to lay everything out so you can visualize what might be missing. There’s even a spot for your trailfood.

Read Aaron Bible’s full review on Gear Institute.

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45+ Amazing Desert Spots in the American Southwest

While most of the U.S. is dipping into a chill for winter, it’s high time for exploring the desert Southwest. This article features some real gems:  Fisher Towers, Mesa Verde, Havasupai campground, Horsehoe Bend, and others. One of our favorites is Bryce Canyon–“a hell of a place to lose a cow.”

Read the whole article by Carlo Alcos here.

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Are You Hiking with the Correct Nutrient Mix?

Fueling the Fire

You’ve picked out the perfect trail with the best views of the grand canyon. Excited to begin, you quickly pull together your gear, knowing the journey to get there will be tough. But, suddenly, you realize that you’re clueless as to what kind of foods will fuel the challenge best.

So, (the question begs to be asked) what exactly should one bring with them to eat while out on the trail?

Nutritional Value is Key

The answer to that question is really quite simple. For physical exercise, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are a must.

Here’s what they can do for you:

Carbohydrates – According to the Appalachian Mountain Club-Boston Chapter, carbohydrates provide, on average, around 100 calories per ounce and can be digested quickly into blood sugar, which is available immediately to your muscles to burn. As a result, carbs serve as the best source of readily available and quick energy.

Simple carbohydrates, which can be found in fruits, for example, can be turned into blood sugar within minutes, thus making excellent high energy trail foods. Complex carbohydrates, on the other hand, like breads and whole grains, usually take an hour or two to digest and keep you loaded up with energy.

Fats – Fats, in comparison, store up to 200 calories per ounce and take longer to digest (hours). They metabolize differently than carbohydrates, providing longer term, endurance energy. However, you’ll need an adequate intake of fats on the trail to properly metabolize carbs, even though those fats will not give you the quick burst of energy that carbohydrates do.

Proteins – Different from the other two food categories, proteins provide only around 80 calories per ounce or less, take days to metabolize, and are never turned directly into blood sugars. Exercise does not increase the short term need for protein, though maintaining a balanced diet aids your health and fitness in general.

Getting the Right Nutrient Mix for Hiking

While all three food categories are important to consider, carbohydrates are essential for outdoor activities like hiking.

According to Sally Hara, a board certified specialist in sports dietetics and owner of ProActive Nutrition, carbohydrates are the primary fuel for physical exercise. Although our bodies burn carbs, fat, and a little protein while hiking, they’ll surely bonk without the consumption of carbohydrates.

(continues)

Want a Free Taste of Trailfoody?

Get a surprise selection of 3 of our trailfoods to try out, plus a Trailfoody stuff sack. Your bag could include energy bars, nut mixes, jerky, energy drink mixes, and more.

It’s valued at over $13. The cost is free. You just pay $4 shipping.

As is noted in the second edition of Conditioning for Outdoor Fitness: Functional Exercise and Nutrition for Every Body, the amount of carbs needed for activities such as long-duration hiking, backpacking, and mountaineering may decrease slightly from the recommended carbohydrate intake of 60-70% during active training periods. Thus, anywhere between 50-70% of your diet should consist of carbs depending on the level of physical exertion you plan to experience while out on the trail.

Keeping all of this information in mind can be a bit overwhelming when preparing for a day’s journey, we know. That’s why Trailfoody is perfect for your fire fueling needs! Our stuff sacks are filled with healthy, nutritious trailfoods that combine to provide the perfect blend of carbs, fats, and proteins that’ll always keep you on the move.

So what are you waiting for? Your next adventure awaits!

Posted on

Are You Hiking with the Correct Nutrient Mix?

Fueling the Fire

You’ve picked out the perfect trail with the best views of the grand canyon. Excited to begin, you quickly pull together your gear, knowing the journey to get there will be tough. But, suddenly, you realize that you’re clueless as to what kind of foods will fuel the challenge best.

So, (the question begs to be asked) what exactly should one bring with them to eat while out on the trail?

Nutritional Value is Key

The answer to that question is really quite simple. For physical exercise, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins are a must.

Here’s what they can do for you:

Carbohydrates – According to the Appalachian Mountain Club-Boston Chapter, carbohydrates provide, on average, around 100 calories per ounce and can be digested quickly into blood sugar, which is available immediately to your muscles to burn. As a result, carbs serve as the best source of readily available and quick energy.

Simple carbohydrates, which can be found in fruits, for example, can be turned into blood sugar within minutes, thus making excellent high energy trail foods. Complex carbohydrates, on the other hand, like breads and whole grains, usually take an hour or two to digest and keep you loaded up with energy.

Fats – Fats, in comparison, store up to 200 calories per ounce and take longer to digest (hours). They metabolize differently than carbohydrates, providing longer term, endurance energy. However, you’ll need an adequate intake of fats on the trail to properly metabolize carbs, even though those fats will not give you the quick burst of energy that carbohydrates do.

Proteins – Different from the other two food categories, proteins provide only around 80 calories per ounce or less, take days to metabolize, and are never turned directly into blood sugars. Exercise does not increase the short term need for protein, though maintaining a balanced diet aids your health and fitness in general.

Getting the Right Nutrient Mix for Hiking

While all three food categories are important to consider, carbohydrates are essential for outdoor activities like hiking.

According to Sally Hara, a board certified specialist in sports dietetics and owner of ProActive Nutrition, carbohydrates are the primary fuel for physical exercise. Although our bodies burn carbs, fat, and a little protein while hiking, they’ll surely bonk without the consumption of carbohydrates.

(continues)

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As is noted in the second edition of Conditioning for Outdoor Fitness: Functional Exercise and Nutrition for Every Body, the amount of carbs needed for activities such as long-duration hiking, backpacking, and mountaineering may decrease slightly from the recommended carbohydrate intake of 60-70% during active training periods. Thus, anywhere between 50-70% of your diet should consist of carbs depending on the level of physical exertion you plan to experience while out on the trail.

Keeping all of this information in mind can be a bit overwhelming when preparing for a day’s journey, we know. That’s why Trailfoody is perfect for your fire fueling needs! Our stuff sacks are filled with healthy, nutritious trailfoods that combine to provide the perfect blend of carbs, fats, and proteins that’ll always keep you on the move.

So what are you waiting for? Your next adventure awaits!