Posted on

This is Why Refueling Throughout the Day is Better

fueling your body for performance hikning

You’ve finally made it to the trail. After a busy morning of packing, preparing a big breakfast, and traveling up to Colorado’s Four Pass Loop, you’ve found yourself eager to begin your family’s latest hiking adventure.

You know the day will be tough, but you can’t wait to experience the Maroon Bells wilderness for yourself. With numerous waterfalls, impressive mountain lakes, and fields of wildflowers, you know it’s going to be a trip well worth the challenge.

But there’s a problem. How do you squeeze out the best performance possible so that you can feel incredible with energy to spare? It’s a long journey, and you know you’re gonna need the right food.

So how do you do it?

keep your energy levels highKeep Your Energy Stores Primed

Think of your energy-producing body as a fire. You can add a lot of fuel at once, making the fire burn super hot, but then it’ll die down quickly as the fuel is depleted. Or, you can feed it a log or two at a time, making the fire hum consistently with strength and energy.

The same is true with how you fuel your body. Keep your fire burning at a consistent rate to be sure that you’ll have enough energy for a big hike or adventure.

Glycogen is your body’s stored energy, but it doesn’t last forever. According to sports medicine expert Elizabeth Quinn, glycogen can get used up in as little as 30 minutes. You’ll need more than that for most outdoor adventures.

And as we’ve mentioned before, refilling that tank of energy depends upon consumption. The sooner and more often you refuel, the faster you’ll regain the energy that’s been lost.

Fueling Through Small Breaks is the Way to Go

Fueling throughout the day is the best way to keep you moving and maximize your performance. That way, energy will be readily available as you go and can be burned once it’s needed.

Thus, it’s incredibly important to choose the right foods to snack on that will provide you with the constant flow of energy necessary for ongoing physical activity.

But how do you know what to bring with you?

high energy fuel for the trailYour Day Food May Be More Important Than Your Dehydrated Dinner

It’s important to bring adequate food with you out on the trail.

As we’ve mentioned before, a large portion of your calories should come from carbohydrates since these convert more quickly into readily available energy. The sooner and more often you refuel, the faster you’ll recover and regain the energy that’s been lost.

And, as noted by Sally Hara, a board certified specialist in sports dietetics and owner of ProActive Nutrition, carrying high energy/high carbohydrate snacks and sport supplements that you can eat along the trail is essential. Foods like energy bars, dried fruit, and mixed nuts can all work to keep you adequately fueled between formal stops and are relatively convenient to eat as you hike.

While you’ll definitely need to consume some fats, (which contain a lot of calories per ounce of food) Hara also mentions that it’s advisable to steer clear from foods with high amounts of fat while hiking, since they are difficult to digest and take longer for the body to process. These foods should be consumed during formal breaks like breakfast and dinner and not while you’re out and about.

Clearly, snack foods are essential. Not only do they provide the energy necessary for ongoing activity, they also serve to make the whole process much easier and worry-free.

But, What If I Prefer a Longer Lunch Break?

If you’re like us, you go on adventures because you want to have fun. So, it’s important to do what you enjoy. If you decide you’d rather have a longer sit-down lunch, then go for it. Just follow these tips:

  • Choose foods you don’t have to cook. Otherwise, you have to break out the camp stove, carry extra water for boiling, and deal with a clean-up effort after you eat (not fun).
  • Make the lunch a little smaller than you would normally eat so you don’t direct too much of your body’s energy to digestion. Supplement that with a few smaller breaks with good energy food to keep your energy levels high.
  • Opt for “shelf stable” foods that don’t need refrigeration. Or, store the food along with some freezer packs. Most sandwiches can last unless it’s really hot, but be careful of ingredients that are likely to spoil, such as mayonnaise.

Trailfoody’s Goal

Our aim is to get you out on the trail much faster, without any hassle, and with the best food for the job.

We’re dedicated to bringing you new, healthy trailfoods each month that are packed with nutrition. And while they can be eaten separately as snacks throughout the day, our trailfood is hand-picked so that they can go together as a meal if you choose to eat them in one sitting!

Learn more here about how you can sign up for Trailfoody today.

Will You Like Trailfoody?

Posted on

This is How to Recharge for Your Next Adventure

how to recharge after hike

You’ve just finished your five and a half mile run around town, and you’re feeling great. Tomorrow, you’ll be heading out with some friends to hike a lengthy portion of the Appalachian Trail up to McAfee Knob, but how can you make sure you’ll have enough pep in your step to get you to the top? 

Loading Up on Carbs

Carbohydrates are the key.

According to the second edition of Conditioning for Outdoor Fitness: Functional Exercise and Nutrition for Every Body, the replacement of body glycogen stores is important if you have been involved in intense exercise lasting for more than an hour or if you have been engaging in endurance activities that often last for more than a few hours.

Glycogen replacement can be quickly achieved if extra carbohydrates are consumed as soon as possible after exercising. This will ensure a quick recovery, especially if you avoid significant activity for at least eight hours following said exercise.

The sooner you refuel, the faster you’ll recover. Thus, eating within 30 minutes of exercising is ideal. And, as is noted in one of our previous blogs, you’ll want to refuel with at least 15 grams of carbs.

However, you can also continue to replenish glycogen during endurance and outdoor activities such as hiking and backpacking by eating snacks and meals with a moderate to high glycemic index after a  workout.

(continues)

Get a Free Taste of Trailfoody

Just Pay $4 shipping

Will you like Trailfoody? Find out by getting a Trailfoody Taste, which includes 3 sample trailfoods, plus the Trailfoody stuff sack. It’s valued at over $13.

How Trailfoody Can Help

Trailfoody can help when it comes to recharging for your next adventure. We provide new, healthy trailfoods each month that are packed with the carbs necessary for both long- and short-term energy.

The kind of energy that you may need for hiking to McAfee Knob the very next day! 

Learn more here about how you can sign up for Trailfoody today and have yours shipped right to your doorstep.